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A 1.13 ct fancy-yellow diamond recently submitted for grading to the GIA resembles the iconic Apple logo. Source: Diego Sanchez.
A 1.13 ct fancy-yellow diamond recently submitted for grading to the GIA resembles the iconic Apple logo. Source: Diego Sanchez.

Fancy 1.13-carat diamond resembles Apple logo

Advances in technology have a way of making the unthinkable possible and such is the case of a novelty cut diamond that strikingly resembles the iconic Apple brand logo.

A 1.13-carat fancy yellow diamond was taken to the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) for colour origin and identification service to determine the stone’s authenticity.

The stone - dubbed the “Apple” diamond - was featured in the GIA’s journal Gems and Gemology for its unique cutting style.

“The diamond was cut in the shape of a bitten apple and bore a striking resemblance to the iconic Apple logo found on Apple Inc products,” one of the authors said, noting that the shape of the diamond “is a welcome addition to the wide range of novelty cut diamonds currently available in the trade.”

“The diamond was cut in the shape of a bitten apple and bore a striking resemblance to the iconic Apple logo found on Apple Inc products...  and is a welcome addition to the wide range of novelty cut diamonds currently available in the trade.”

According to the authors, the maker could have chosen the ‘Apple’ cutting style as a novelty and retained the stone’s weight due to its “significant windowing” properties to allow for “more efficient light return”.

Modern technology has paved the way for jewellery designers to be more creative with designs and cutting styles that ensure the efficient light return and weight retention properties of diamonds or fashion stones to resemble other items.

The GIA has also seen similar uniquely shaped diamonds submitted for colour origin and identification service, such as a 0.37-carat sword-shaped yellowish brown diamond and a “seated Buddha”.

Established in 1931, the GIA is one of the leading authorities on diamonds, colour gemstones and pearls. It is a non-profit institute dedicated to education and research in gemmology and jewellery arts, as well as setting global standards on diamond and gemstone quality to help protect consumers.

 

Under a long-wave UV light, the novelty cut diamond showed strong blue fluorescence. Source: Diego Sanchez.
Under a long-wave UV light, the novelty cut diamond showed strong blue fluorescence. Source: Diego Sanchez.


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