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Articles from DIAMOND JEWELLERY (983 Articles)










The 105-carat Type IIa D-colour is considered by many to be the world’s most valuable diamond and prior to the coronation in early May, sat in the Queen Mother’s Crown. | Tim Graham/Corbis via Getty Images
The 105-carat Type IIa D-colour is considered by many to be the world’s most valuable diamond and prior to the coronation in early May, sat in the Queen Mother’s Crown. | Tim Graham/Corbis via Getty Images

Indian diplomats to demand the return of legendary diamond

Following the coronation of King Charlies III calls for the return of the famed Koh-i-Noor diamond to India have ramped up.

The 105-carat Type IIa D-colour is considered by many to be the world’s most valuable diamond and prior to the coronation in early May, sat in the Queen Mother’s Crown.

govind mohan Ministry of Culture
govind mohan Ministry of Culture
“The thrust of this effort to repatriate India's artifacts comes from the personal commitment of prime minister Narendra Modi, who has made it a major priority.”
Govind Mohan, Ministry of Culture

Queen Camilla Parker Bowles recently had the diamond removed from the crown to avoid heightening political tension over the matter.

Despite these efforts, Indian diplomats in London are expected to formally request the return of the Koh-i-Noor later this year. It’s expected they also request the return of other artifacts taken during the colonial rule between 1858 to 1947.

India’s secretary for the Ministry of Culture, Govind Mohan, told The Telegraph: "The thrust of this effort to repatriate India's artifacts comes from the personal commitment of prime minister Narendra Modi, who has made it a major priority.”

Discovered at the Kollur Mine in India in the 14th century, it’s suspected the Koh-i-Noor rough was in excess of 800 carats. Following the cutting and polishing, the diamond passed between various Asian regional powers before the British annexation of Punjab in 1849.

The diamond was then ceded to Queen Victoria and the British royal family has maintained its possession for the past 170 years.

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Renewed demands for return of legendary diamond

 











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