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Gemstones

Articles from GEMSTONES - LOOSE (254 Articles), GEMSTONES - SYNTHETIC (53 Articles), GEMSTONES - CHRYSOPRASE (38 Articles)











The mystery of ametrine

The most unique aspect of ametrine is that it marries two well-known gemstones: amethyst and citrine. Both varieties belong to the quartz family and are coloured by the slight presence of iron impurities.
Image courtesy: Elemental Creations
Image courtesy: Elemental Creations

The marked difference in the colours of ametrine reflects the dramatic temperature change that occurs during the gem’s formation and not some type of artificialy treatment.

Because ametrine is found in large crystals, the value per carat does not increase as markedly as it does with other gemstones. A more expensive ametrine is one with intense hues that show a marked colour contrast. The gem is relatively inexpensive, considering it is predominantly mined from only one location in the world.

While ametrine was originally discovered in Brazil, today its sole source is the Anahimine, in eastern Bolivia.

Here, it can be found concealed within dolomitic limestone, occurring in veins running through the rocks. The gem is quite durable, with a hardness rating of seven on the Moh’s scale and no cleavages.

Natural finished ametrine is typically faceted into a rectangle equally divided between the colours of amethyst and citrine. To increase light reflection, a checkerboard pattern of facets is sometimes added to the top of the stone. Creative ametrine cutters can make different patterns of purple and yellow appear throughout the stone.

Ametrine reputedly embodies many mythical properties for its wearers. Believers swear the gem combines the powers of amethyst and citrine, coupled with its own healing abilities. Ametrine is said to aid in meditation, relieve tension and eliminate negativity and prejudice.

On a physical basis, some say ametrine will remove toxins from the body, treat arthritis and aid muscular disorders. It is also believed to facilitate absorption of antioxidants and is reputedly useful in treating a number of disorders including those of the digestive and nervous systems, the heart and skin.

These beliefs are likely to have originated from the 17th century, when ametrine was first discovered. A Spanish conquistador received it as a dowry for marrying a princess named Anahi (hence the name of the primary ametrine mine today). Ametrine was subsequently introduced to Europe through the conquistador’s gifts to the Spanish queen.

Despite its early beginnings, ametrine has only been commercially produced since 1980. Before this, it was extremely rare and was known as amethyst-citrine quartz, trystine or golden amethyst.

The obscurity and mystery cloaking ametrine renders it a rare and special gem for use in ornamentation or self-adornment.

No specific care is required for ametrine pieces as they are generally not susceptible to damage from temperature change or domestic chemicals. Frequent wear in rings, however, will dull the stone’s polish.
 


The marked difference in the colours of ametrine reflects the dramatic temperature change that occurs during the gem’s formation and not some type of artificialy treatment.

Because ametrine is found in large crystals, the value per carat does not increase as markedly as it does with other gemstones. A more expensive ametrine is one with intense hues that show a marked colour contras










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Wednesday, 11 December, 2019 01:25am
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