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Gemstones

Articles from GEMSTONES - LOOSE (254 Articles), GEMSTONES - SYNTHETIC (54 Articles), GEMSTONES - CHRYSOPRASE (40 Articles)










Kunzite: the new pink

Kunzite is the youngest member of the spodumene family and is a composition of lithium aluminium and silicate.
Verdura
Verdura

This gem is one of two gemstone varieties of spodumene; the other variety is called Hiddenite.

The difference between the two occurs because hiddenite has chromium as a colouring agent, producing an emerald green colour, and kunzite is coloured by manganese, resulting in a pink to violet shade.

Discovered only recently, Kunzite is a relatively young gemstone and is becoming more popular today, making an attractive eye-catcher in jewellery. The gem is named after New York jeweller and Tiffany's head gemmologist George Frederick Kunz who became the first person to give a comprehensive description of it after a finding in California in 1902.

Kunz described the robust pastel-pink gemstone as having two distinct properties: the first, phosphorescence, is given to stones such as diamonds that are observed to glow in a darkened room after exposure to ultra-violet rays; the second, pleochroism, given to stones that show different colouring when viewed from different angles.

These phenomena are best seen in larger sized gems set into jewellery, like pendants, drop and chandelier earrings, or rings with open prong or bar settings that let light flow freely through them, accentuating kunzite's fire to full effect.

Kunzite can appear violet, pink or even colourless, depending entirely upon the angle from which it is viewed.

The top and bottom of the crystal reveal its deepest hues, though most kunzites are not bold in colour, making those with strong shades very valuable.

Since the discovery of kunzite happened just over a hundred years ago, no legends about its usage as a healing stone exist. Its application by modern-day holistic healers has nevertheless been very successful and the stone is said to create a balance between one's physical and emotional bodies, aiding in security and settling any fear brought on by others.

Kunzite jewellery is said to align all Chakras and remove energy blockages for the wearer. Pink kunzite is considered a major gemstone of love: encouraging self-love, unconditional love of others, gentleness and improved communication in relationships.

Gaze at or hold a kunzite to release daily stress, smooth out knotted muscles, calm nerves, anger or fear. In the physical sense, it is most commonly said to help bone and spinal cord problems.

The stone can also help with hearing loss and ear canal disorders, as well as stimulating fertility.

Kunzite is currently mined in Afghanistan, Brazil, Burma, Canada, Madagascar, Mexico, Pakistan, Russia, Sweden and the United States. Due to its cleavage, splintery fracture and strong pleochroism, kunzite is considered a challenging stone for gem cutters hoping to enhance its attractive and highly desirable pink quality.

Because the cutting of kunzite is so difficult, in the past many famous gold-smiths have tried to create exquisite works of art using this stone in order to prove their craftsmanship.

One of the most famous facetted kunzite specimen’s from Brazil weighs over 800-carats. This one-of-a-kind piece is perfectly cut in the shape of a heart and shows no inclusions.

While Kunzite reaches 6.5-7 on Moh's scale, it is also considered fragile. Often labelled an evening stone, it should not be exposed to direct sunlight as it may fade. For this reason, jewellery comprised of the kunzite gemstone should never be worn while sunbathing or on the beach.


This gem is one of two gemstone varieties of spodumene; the other variety is called Hiddenite.

The difference between the two occurs because hiddenite has chromium as a colouring agent, producing an emerald green colour, and kunzite is coloured by manganese, resulting in a pink to violet shade.

Discovered only recently, Kunzite is a relatively young gemstone and is becoming more popular today, making an attractive eye-catcher in jewellery. The gem is named after New York jeweller and Tiffany's head gemmologist George Frederick Kunz who became the first person to give a comprehensive description of it after a finding in California in 1902.

Kunz described the robust pastel-pink gemstone as having two distinct properties: the first, phosphorescence, is given to stones such as diamonds that are observed to glow in a darkened room after exposure to ultra-violet rays; the second, pleochroism, given to stones that show different colouring when viewed from different angles.

These phenomena are best seen in larger sized gems set into jewellery, like pendants, drop and chandelier earrings, or rings with open prong or bar settings that let light flow freely through them, accentuating kunzite's fire to full effect.

Kunzite can appear violet, pink or even colourless, depending entirely upon the angle from which it is viewed.

The top and bottom of the crystal reveal its deepest hues, though most kunzites are not bold in colour, making those with strong shades very valuable.

Since the discovery of kunzite happened just over a hundred years ago, no legends about its usage as a healing stone exist. Its application by modern-day holistic he











Arthur J. Gallagher & Co
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