Stuller Inc
advertisement
Stuller Inc
advertisement
Stuller Inc
advertisement
Goto your account
Search Stories by: 
and/or
 

Business












Leaders learn from their staff. It’s one of the most important things they do each day. It gives leaders the information they need to improve things for customers, employees, and sales results. | Source: Freepik
Leaders learn from their staff. It’s one of the most important things they do each day. It gives leaders the information they need to improve things for customers, employees, and sales results. | Source: Freepik

Leadership in business: Look who’s talking!

What does it take to lead a business? DOUG FLEENER discusses the characteristics shared by successful trailblazers in business.

When it comes to studying what works – and equally, what doesn’t work – in business, it’s important to pay attention to ‘who’s talking’.

No, we aren’t talking about the 1993 romantic comedy with Kristie Alley and John Travolta with the talking baby voiced by Bruce Willis!

There are two kinds of leaders in business - those who talk more than they listen and those who listen more than they talk.

It should be immediately obvious which one will be more successful in their role.

Even a talking baby would say it’s the leader who listens more than talks.

Ask most leaders, and they will tell you they listen more. Many of them are mistaken!

During my time working for Bose, I was travelling with a multi-unit manager. One day while visiting stores, I noticed he talked about 90 per cent of the time with the staff.

He had them engaged and they were laughing. He was telling them about new programs and he would talk to them about new sales tools.

"You will be shocked at how much valuable information you can collect by simply taking the time to listen."

I noticed on more than one occasion that when an employee tried to ask a question, he would cut them off and keep talking.

Afterwards, I asked him what he learned on the visit.

He talked about all the things he saw in the store; however, he couldn’t tell me a single observation he had about the employees.

How were the employees feeling? Are they happy? What suggestions did the staff have? How can we better support them? How can we help them sell more?

He had no idea! He not only had no idea about the things I asked. Perhaps worst of all, he had no idea that he dominated the conversation and talked 90 per cent of the time.

Education

Leaders learn from their staff. It’s one of the most important things they do each day.

It gives leaders the information they need to improve things for customers, employees, and sales results. You can’t learn when you’re talking.

When you’re with employees, you should be looking at who’s talking.

When you’re with customers, look at who's talking. When you’re with suppliers, look at who’s talking.

You will be shocked at how much valuable information you can collect by simply taking the time to listen.

The best leaders not only listen - they know they listen more than talk. So, force yourself to not speak during some exchanges.

There’s no need to be rude; however, it will open the door to new opportunities.

So let me ask you one simple question: How much are you listening compared to talking?

Self-reflection

Every morning I start my day by setting self-expectations on the type of person I want to be for the day.

"In business, there are many times you need help from others. Never let your ego get in the way of doing so."

By starting my day this way, I am quicker to catch myself if I veer off anytime in the day. Just as necessary, I reflect on the personal and work improvements I want to make in the day.

It’s always my goal to improve at least three things every day.

By doing that, I know I will make at least 1,095 improvements in a year.

Daily self-improvement has been crucial to my personal and professional success, as well as my overall happiness.

I would encourage you to adjust your daily routine for self-reflection, self-expectations, and self-improvement.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help

In business, there are many times you need help from others. Never let your ego get in the way of doing so.

Asking for help is not just about receiving assistance; it also creates an opportunity for you to give back in return.

When you seek help from others, whether it be from a supplier, an employee or even a customer, you acknowledge their expertise and acknowledge that you value their contributions.

It fosters a sense of empowerment and validation. As an added bonus, asking for help is an example to others and encourages them to seek help when needed.

I’m sure you’d agree that encouraging that attitude from your employees is vital.

Asking for help becomes a powerful act of giving, enabling you to receive and contribute to the collective well-being and success of those around you.

Is there anyone you could assist by asking for their help?

More reading:
Diving deep into the personality traits of great business leaders
Secrets of business leadership revealed
Prepare your business to face the expected unexpected
Looking for – and finding – a business’ ‘lost customers’
Retailers can’t afford to ignore the business lessons of 2020
 

Read eMag











ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Doug Fleener

Contributor • Sixth Star Consulting


Doug Fleener is the author of a new book titled The Day Makes The Year (Makes The Life). Learn more: dougfleener.com

Chemgold
advertisement





Read current issue

login to my account
Username: Password:
Ellendale Diamonds Australia
advertisement
World Shiner
advertisement
Jeweller Magazine
advertisement
© 2024 Befindan Media