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Search Results - Mikaelah Egan

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Gemstones
Gemmologists who changed the game: Jack Stanley Taylor

The latest addition to this series of gemmologists who left their mark on the world of gemstones and jewellery is a man who likely contributed to the education of many readers of Jeweller. Read more »
Richard T. Liddicoat became editor-in-chief of Gems & Gemology in 1952, a role he served for more than 50 years. | Source: GIA Alumni Collective

Gemstones
Gemmologists who changed the game: Richard T. Liddicoat Jr.

In the latest instalment of the ‘game-changing gemmologists’ series, we introduce a figure of such influence that he likely requires little introduction - Richard T. Liddicoat Jr. Read more »
By the time of his death, Eduard Josef Gübelin was recognised as perhaps the most important and influential gemmologist of the 20th century. He helped establish gemmology as a science and gave the industry one of its most important weapons against imitations and counterfeits. | Source: Gubelin

Gemstones
Gemmologists who changed the game: Eduard Josef Gubelin

In the previous issue of Jeweller, we covered the life and times of mineralogist George Kunz. Approximately 20 years before the death of Kunz, Eduard Josef Gübelin was born in eastern Switzerland in 1913. Read more »
Kunz was born in Manhattan, New York City, USA, and began an interest in minerals at a very young age. By his teens, he had amassed a collection of over four thousand items, which he sold for four hundred dollars to the University of Minnesota. | Source: Wikipedia

Gemstones
Game-changing gemmologists: George Frederick Kunz

In the previous issue of Jeweller, we discussed the legacy of René-Just Haüy, the father of modern crystallography. Read more »
"All minerals which belong to the same species have an invariable form, in which the faces lie in the direction of the natural fracture surfaces corresponding to the mechanical division of the crystals." | Source: IUCr

Gemstones
Game-changing Gemmologists: René-Just Haüy

After the completion of the well-received Tools of the Trade series, it seems only fitting that Jeweller should next delve into the men and women who have sharpened the modern world of gemmology. Read more »

Gemstones
Tools of the Trade: Part III

In the opening two parts of the Tools of the Trade series, we covered some of the important instruments used by gemmologists in the examination of gemstones. Read more »

Gemstones
Tools of the trade: Part 1

Like many scientific practices, gemmology relies on the use of various specialty instruments to measure and assess properties of gemstones. Read more »
Above: Piaget; Stephen Silver Fine Jewelry; Dior Below: Selim Mouzannar; Sunita Nahata

Gemstones
Garnets Part I: Pyrope, Almandine, Spessartine

Historically, garnets have played a significant role in the world of gems. They have adorned the necks of high society ranging from Egyptian pharaohs to Victorian-era royalty and beyond. Read more »
Above: Hemmerle; Andreoli; Glenn Spiro Below: Chanel; Moiseikin

Gemstones
Garnets Part II: Grossular, Andradite, Uvarovite

Compared with the well-known reddish browns and purplish red garnet varieties of pyrope, almandine, and spessartine, the second solid solution series producing gem quality garnets generally goes under the radar of your average jewellery customers. Read more »
Above: Moussaieff; David Morris; Clogau Below: Kendra Scott; Amanya

Gemstones
Pearls Part V: Examining the Exotics

To the average consumer, or even the average jewellery sales assistant, pearls are often known to be gloriously lustrous, covered in glittering nacre, as close to white as possible, and aiming to be perfectly round. Read more »
Above: Moksh; Cult Gaia; Van Cleef and Arpels Below: Little H; Ikecho

Gemstones
Pearls Part IV: Seed and Keshi

Seed pearls have long been a favourite choice for intricate designs throughout jewellery history, whilst the baroque forms of keshi pearls are today featured to bring jewellery design a touch of uniquity. Read more »
Above: Yoko London; Tasaki; David Morris

Gemstones
Pearls Part III: Akoya

Typically round in shape, white or cream in colour with a pinkish overtone, and possessing a high lustre – Akoya pearls are a classic. For consumers of the western world, these saltwater cultured pearls are the most popular choice. Read more »
<b>Above:</b>Autore Pearls; Arosha Taglia <b>Below:</b> Assael pearls; Musson

Gemstones
Pearls Part II: South Sea & Tahitian

South Sea and Tahitian pearls are the most prized of pearls cultured today. These exceptionally lustrous beauties can only be grown with meticulous care in the most pristine environmental conditions. Read more »
<b>Above (L to R) </b>Pacharee; Blue Nile; Mizuki

Gemstones
Pearls Part I: Freshwater

Pearls – an organic gem - have been revered pieces of treasure for thousands of years, having adorned the necks of nobility spanning across Persia, Babylon, Egypt, Rome, and beyond. Read more »
<b>Above:</b> Courbet <b>Inset:</b> Scio Diamond Tech

Gemstones
Part III: Synthetic diamond misconceptions

Over the past few years, comparisons made by the opposing ‘camps’ of natural and synthetic diamond have been rampant, with a large amount of misinformation clouding the scene. Read more »

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